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1 edition of Degradability of polymers and plastics found in the catalog.

Degradability of polymers and plastics

Degradability of polymers and plastics

conference, 27 and 28 November 1973, Institution of Electrical Engineers, London.

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Published by Plastics Institute in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Cover title.

ContributionsPlastics Institute.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20823174M

Oxo-biodegradable plastics—which are made from polymers such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), or polystyrene (PS)—contain a prodegradant catalyst—often a salt of manganese or iron, and are tested in accordance with ASTM D or BS, or AFNOR Accord T, as to their ability to degrade and then biodegrade in the open. And because the biodegradability of a plastic lies with the chemical properties of the polymer —and not the source of the feedstock— biodegradable plastics can be either bio- or petroleum-based. Biodegradable vs. compostable vs. oxo-degradable plastics. Nearly .

Summary: Based on the International Workshop on Controlled Life-Cycle of Polymeric Materials held in Stockholm, this work examines degradable polymers and the recycling of plastic materials. It highlights the results on recycling and waste management, including topics such as renewable resources, processing and products, and environmental issues. Looking ahead, biodegradable polymers could become the commodity plastics of the future, but possibly only for applications where the degradability is a part of the function. Good examples are biodegradable mulch films in agriculture or drug delivery agents in biomedicine.

Polymers , 5 3 to the fact that plastics typically float and, therefore, tend to accumulate on beaches [25]. The bulk of debris washed onto the beaches studied, in terms of numbers, is composed of plastic items; often three. This review focuses on biodegradable polymer alternatives as a suitable replacement for petroleum based plastics. Discover the world's research 17+ million members.


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Degradability of polymers and plastics Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book brings together a number of key biopolymer and biodegradable plastics topics in one place for a broad audience of engineers and scientists, especially those designing with biopolymers and biodegradable plastics, or evaluating the options for switching from traditional plastics to biopolymers.

Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes.

However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. Lack of degradability and the closing of landfill sites as well as growing water and land pollution problems have led to concern about polymers.

The excessive use of polymer products leads to the need for biodegradable polymers and biodegradation of polymers in the last few years. Biodegradable plastics and polymers were first introduced in Cited by: 2. degradation of plastics by hydrolysis is a two-step process: first, the enzyme binds to the polymer substrate then subsequently cataly zes a hydrolytic cleavage.

Polymers are degraded into low. Biodegradable plastics are plastics that can be decomposed by the action of living organisms, usually microbes, into water, carbon dioxide, and biomass. Biodegradable plastics are commonly produced with renewable raw materials, micro-organisms, petrochemicals, or combinations of all three.

While the words "bioplastic" and "biodegradable plastic" are similar, they are not synonymous. Polymers:Regulationsand MethodsforTesting Dr. Rolf-Joachim M¸ller result, polymeric materials (plastics) are now used in all sectors of life as very durable products with tailor-made proper- degradability of chemicals in the environ-ment(andespeciallyinwastewater)asone.

Degradable Polymers, Recycling, and Plastics Waste Management - Albertsson - Google Books Based on the International Workshop on Controlled Life-Cycle of Polymeric Materials held in Stockholm, this work examines degradable polymers and the recycling of plastic materials.

Handbook of Biodegradable Polymers: Isolation, Synthesis, Characterization and Applications Andreas Lendlein (Editor), Adam Sisson (Editor) ISBN: Hardcover / E-book pages € / € Click here for more information. Reviewed by Seema Agarwal, Universität Bayreuth, Germany. Book Description Based on the International Workshop on Controlled Life-Cycle of Polymeric Materials held in Stockholm, this work examines degradable polymers and the recycling of plastic materials.

With natural polymers, specific enzymes have developed over billions of years to aid rapid degradation; for most of the plastics developed over the last 80 years, no such enzymes exist. There are already several solutions to the problems of both manufacturing and disposing of plastics, but these are not always mutually compatible.

Additive masterbatches to promote degradability in plastics By Andrew Barclay, Wells Plastics Ltd Additives to promote degradability in polymers are not a new concept, but have been in the technological arena for at least 30 years following pioneering work in the field by, for example, Scott G.,Griffin G, Gilead D., and Albertsson A.

The development of suitable polymers and plastics and the implementation of these alternatives is a slow process, and huge amounts of conventional plastics and polymers still enter landfill sites every year. This article updates the issue, complicated scientifically and legislatively, as we strive for environmental harmony in our lifestyles.

Kinetics of Polymer Hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of polymer bonds follows 2 nd order reaction kinetics, i.e., the rate of the reaction is proportional to the concentration of water and hydrolytic polymer bonds. The hydrolysis products are chain ends, but the chain end concentrations (E) usually are very low and their direct measurement is difficult.

Plastics are one of the most widely used materials and, in most cases, they are designed to have long life times. Thus, plastics contain a complex blend of stabilizers that prevent them from degrading too quickly.

Unfortunately, many of the most advantageous properties of plastics such as their chemical, physical and biological inertness and durability present challenges when plastic is.

the environment. The present book gives thorough information to biodegradable plastic and polymers. This is an excellent book for scientists engineers, students and industrial researchers in the field of bio based materials.

Contents NIIR Project Consultancy Services (NPCS) 1/ Based on the International Workshop on Controlled Life-Cycle of Polymeric Materials held in Stockholm, this work examines degradable polymers and the recycling of plastic materials.

It highlights recent results on recycling and waste management, including topics such as renewable resources, degradation, processing and products, and environmental is. Plastics and natural materials such as rubber or cellulose are composed of very large molecules called rs are constructed from relatively small molecular fragments known as monomers that are joined together.

Wool, cotton, silk, wood and leather are examples of natural polymers that have been known and used since ancient times. The susceptibility of a polymer or a plastic material to biodegradation depends exclusively on the chemical structure of the polymer.

For this reason, whether the polymer is made of renewable resources (biomass) or non-renewable (fossil) resources is irrelevant to bio-degradability.

The history and recent developments in environmentally degradable commodity and specialty polymers and plastics are briefly described. Degradation pathways are mentioned, polymer types, including blends, are reported and the limitations of current testing protocols raised. The chapter concludes with generalizations on structural requirements for degradable polymers.

"Covers recent advances in polymer degradation and stabilization. Focuses on the basics of photo- and bio-degradability. Delineates special and general environmental parameters such as solar irradiation, temperature, and agrochemical exposure.

Surveys plastic waste disposal strategies such as recycling, incineration, chemical recovery by pyrolysis. There have been a few studies that have established a link between plastic degradability and the degree of crystallisation of the polymer [39,72,73,75,76,77].

Increased crystallisation limits chain movement and decreases the availability of polymer chains for degradative agents, such as microbial lipases or other ester lysing molecules (Figure.Degradability, Biodegradability & Compostability Degradability.

A plastic can be described as degradable when it undergoes a significant change in initial properties due to chemical cleavage of the macromolecules forming a polymeric item regardless of the mechanism of chain cleavage i.e.

there is no requirement for the plastics to degrade due to the action of naturally occurring micro-organisms.production of plastics with high degree of degradability. The word ‘bio-plastic’ is used confusingly.

In our understanding, however, bio-plastics consist of either biodegradable plastics (i.e., plastics produced from fossil materials) or bio-based plastics (i.e., plastics synthesized from biomass or renewable resources).